Gender/ Body

20160915_071101

I thought it would be interesting to post a product, as they are always branded and branding is ALWAYS targeted toward a specific audience. Mouth rinses are gender neutral. Teeth whitening is gender neutral. Upon first glance, this product looks like it is marketed toward both genders, as it is mainly blue (a “boy” color) but has some maroon (a “girl” color). I felt at first, that the shiny, sparkly look was only to coincide with the idea of a teeth whitening mouth rinse. BUT upon looking longer, I have determined that this is definitely female biased. Females are more likely to use teeth whitening products. The title is “glamorous white”….I don’t know any guys that prefer being called glamorous. There is a lot of shine and flashy design to the packaging, in which I feel is “girly”. Yet, notice how I have been using quotes, because I don’t think there should be specific gender bias of anything. Pink may be “girly” but guys wear pink too. Power lifting may seem “manly” but girls do it too. I think in the way back, old days, genders were more separated. There were roles. The men went out and hunted or fought wars, while the women were at home cooking, cleaning, and mending to the children. As women have gained more rights, they have come out of this very specific gender role. Women are now C.E.Os of huge companies, they fight in the army, and more. Along with the disappearance of gender roles, there has been much more gender fluidity. Although transgender people have existed forever, they used to have to hid their true identity 100% or they would be in huge trouble. Nowadays, people do not always have to hide it, as it has become more generally accepted. There are also girls who will dress boyish without feeling they are transgender or need to be a boy, and boys who will dress more feminine without feeling transgender or need to be a girl. Especially in the gay community, you see people dressing more in the opposite gender looking clothes. I think this is because the gay community is very comfortable with themselves and are not afraid to be criticized for looking girly or looking boyish. When people look a way that you cannot tell their gender, I honestly do not notice. Everyone has their own style, personal interests, and goals in mind. If you feel good in your skin, who cares what you look like.

Advertisements

3 thoughts on “Gender/ Body

  1. Christina,
    At first glance of the Mouthwash, I would agree that the purple color and shiny label is very eye catching. However, I do not think I would agree that it is female bias. Maybe the interpretation of bias is more dependent on the upbringing or personal views of the person looking at the product. To me, the males in my life have never had a problem wearing purple, so that color to me has no gender as my mom and sister also wear it. However, the shiny label just makes me think of the awesome chrome paint colors you can get on your car that have a deep hue of the color but shine and reflect like chrome.
    I do agree the word “Glamorous” is used in media towards the female population much more so than the males. So that may be pointing to a bias in the company, or the advertising side of the business. However before I make that assumption, I would like to see the other Mouthwash products the company sells and see if maybe that product line is designed as a “his and hers” where there is a matching product for the males and females.

  2. Christina, I agree that the bottle design of the mouthwash does seem more on the feminine side of the spectrum. Of courses it is not as distinct or obvious as other types of personal care products such as certain brands of deodorant and razors. I think that the feminine marketing is more subtle. Words like “Glamorous” and “Lux” tend to be more than not aimed toward women. I think that more than anything, the font that they chose for the word “Glamorous” seem curvy and thin, like many other products aimed toward women. Typically when a product is aimed toward men, the font is boxier and heavier. I think that the product is more neutral than one or the other, but slightly more on the feminine side of target audience.

  3. Christina, I agree that the bottle design of the mouthwash does seem more on the feminine side of the spectrum. Of courses it is not as distinct or obvious as other types of personal care products such as certain brands of deodorant and razors. I think that the feminine marketing is more subtle. Words like “Glamorous” and “Lux” tend to be more than not aimed toward women. I think that more than anything, the font that they chose for the word “Glamorous” seem curvy and thin, like many other products aimed toward women. Typically when a product is aimed toward men, the font is boxier and heavier. I think that the product is more neutral than one or the other, but slightly more on the feminine side of target audience.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s